Gerrit for Core-Devs
Exherbo / September 29, 2013

There have been a few questions and potential misunderstandings I’m going to try to address here. I’ll update this post if new stuff comes up. Getting the foo Or: How do I become a Core-Dev on Gerrit? Simple: You register with your GitHub or Google account, then you ask any other core dev to add you to the group. At least Bo “zlin” Ørsted Andresen and I know how to do it and every member has the necessary privileges. Reviewing Or: +1+1 != +2 Every registered user can comment and/or -1/+1 a change. This is an indication said user has reviewed the patch and, ideally, tested it. It’s basically only an opinion, though. Only Core-Devs can +2 a change. This means they’ve reviewed and tested that change and are approving it. The change then will get merged and pushed. It’s important to remember, though, that +1’s do NOT add up. You can +1 a change a hundred times but it will still need one bold man (or woman) to +2 it. Important as well, don’t forget to press the “Submit” button if you want to get a change merged. What about testing (or the lack of)? Everyone who +2’s a change at least (ideally, +1 would…

Gerrit Code Review for Exherbo
Exherbo / September 15, 2013

This post is outdated and only kept for historical reasons. I’ve installed a Gerrit Code Review instance on my server for use with Exherbo. Gerrit is a code review tool and allows for discussing patches and keeping the results for future reference get notified by email about changes (if you want) easily work on every Exherbo repository contributors to get their repositories added to Gerrit as well (optional but strongly recommended) You’ll find an introduction to Gerrit here. Notes: You need a GitHub or Google account. The email address you wish to use in Gerrit must be configured in your GitHub account. You MUST use your real name for copyright reasons. Gerrit replicates merged changes pretty much immediately. This sometimes/rarely fails on the first attempt for various reason. I’ve implemented a fallback that occurs every 5 minutes. How to use Gerrit: Initial setup in two easy steps: Go to https://galileo.mailstation.de/gerrit//, in the upper right corner, click “Sign in”. Authorize Gerrit with GitHub or Google.  Cloning a repository: Click “Projects”, “List”, then choose a project. You should see several methods for cloning the project, the easiest way is to choose the ssh method. Clone, e. g. git clone ssh://<user name>@galileo.mailstation.de:29418/alip Install a hook that sets a Change-Id automatically…

Summer’s End by Lisa Morton
Book Review / September 1, 2013

Summer’s End by Lisa Morton My rating: 1 of 5 stars Occult nonsense and boring at that Let’s instead start at the very beginning: The cover. It looks cheap and badly done. Tons of artifacts, especially around the arms. The text looks like it belongs to some romance novel, not a wanna-be occult horror “novella”. And, oh, yes, it certainly is a “novella” which is good because much more than the about 24.000 words this thing offers would have been insufferable. Since some endorsements are placed prominently at the beginning, let’s see what others have to say. A certain Gary A. Braunbeck states it’s “the best work she’s ever done” – well, thanks, Gary, for the warning. He adds another notable statement “Don’t start reading with any preconceived notions about horror *or* storytelling because they’ll be shredded into confetti […]”. He’s completely right: I’ve always thought storytelling was about making the reader feel, breathe and live within the story. Gary wouldn’t agree, I guess, if he thinks what Morton does is storytelling. According to some Ray Garton, Morton “has created something so strikingly unique that it stands alone in the genre.” – Yes, I don’t think I’ve ever read something…